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motogrrl
06-23-2004, 06:59 PM
I had a student this past weekend who just passed the MSF/BRC class and who is interested in a Ducati.

He's not interested in a Monster. :-/

He is interested in either a 749 or an 800ss. Which of these would be best for a newbie? Since I've not ridden either, I told him I couldn't give an opinion.

He may write in himself.

TIA,
Kathy
M900

Torben
06-23-2004, 07:01 PM
My SS800F was a great learner. Never hurt me at all and has enough power and handling but not too much.
My $0.02 (pretax)

darkduc
06-23-2004, 07:26 PM
Having owned a 1200cc Buell and now my 749, I'd have to go with the SS800 as my recommendation. The SBKs are a little much for a first time rider to deal with in my opinion. There's a lot of throttle there to get yourself in trouble on a 749. Much more than on my 1200cc Buell. I haven't owned or ridden a SS800 but I'm sure it is comparable to the Buell... Both air cooled, both more upright riding style, etc..

DJS
06-23-2004, 08:37 PM
Well, I'm going to be the naysayer in the group and say buy what make him feel good. If he has his heart set on a Superbike he should go for it. But count yourself forewarned, the 749 is a superbike and if he goes down it will cost $$$$.$$. Also he will need great self restraint on the throttle. Because not having the experience he can get into big trouble. The 749 is a forgiving bike. More so than the 748. I have never ridden a SS but I have heard from people in the know that the 749 is a more comfy ride.

Something to think about. When I bought my Yamaha R6 I thought it was very difficult to ride at low speeds. When I picked up my 748 I felt it was much easier to ride but uncomfortable for long periods of time.

It's all in the wrist. If your students can control themselves and remember they have little experience they will be ok. I think this needs to be taken in consideration per student. Some people simply have more natural ability than others. Those how have it will do fine on a Superbike. Granted they don’t go crazy and get a litre bike.

spokalooduc
06-24-2004, 08:58 AM
Im also on the superbike side of the fence, but it comes with a caveat. I spent the better part of 20 years on dirt bikes before I ever laid hands on smooth tired creatures. My 748 is my first bike, but I see many of my friends who never spent time on the dirt crashing repeatedly and learning from their mistakes early putting their CBR's and TL's in the ditch (I have pictures of both as well!). I think if the rider is skilled enough to handle bad situations, its a fantastic first bike.

Except for the fact that you will never ride anything other than a Duc Superbike again......

E 748

TLRMAN
06-24-2004, 02:56 PM
:eek: First bike a 749 :eek: SS800 :eek:
Atleast he has took the right class but he should have maybe asked his instructor about what bike to get.

I would tell him to pick up a used bike 500 cc or less to get used to the traffic and get some street smarts before getting a fine bike like above.

He could always sell a used bike for about what he pays for it a year later if he keeps it up.

Just my .02 cents

DJS
06-24-2004, 03:17 PM
He did ask his instructor and Kathy, the instructor, posted the question for him. I still think he will be ok. Agreed not the best learning bike but if it’s what he wants it’s what he wants. He will need to be extra careful.

mikimoto
06-24-2004, 03:52 PM
I read that Eddie Lawson (could of been another track racer) said that beginner riders should be forwarned - the more cc's, the more rider errors are enhanced. I agree, 500 cc's or less for a beginner. There are too many errors that a beginner makes, that can result in serious injury.

Miki

TLRMAN
06-24-2004, 04:18 PM
He did ask his instructor and Kathy, the instructor, posted the question for him. I still think he will be ok. Agreed not the best learning bike but if it’s what he wants it’s what he wants. He will need to be extra careful.

I am sorry the first time I read that I thought it was a teacher other then the MSC.

If the above instructor feels or thinks he can handle this type of bike then I supose its ok.

But not me still I think a person buying there first road bike should start small and work there way up. Its just a safer option.

Torben
06-25-2004, 09:21 AM
Without knowing the person it's hard to say. My very first bike ever in the history of the world was my 2003 SS800F. I'm now heading in to my second year and I have that sweet 749 jobbie. It all depends on your ability to learn, be safe, operate within (or just safely beyond) your limits and all that good stuff. I don't think there's any one right answer - the only two people that know are Kathy and her student.

quasi_d
06-25-2004, 10:19 AM
I'm with TLR on this. Unless the guy has off-road riding experience already (which I personally feel does make a difference to the absolute noob), a small displacement, trouble-free, lightweight, used bike will be best in the very beginning (plus having some kind of mentor). I think we forget how overwhelming all the input is at first, figuring out the controls, shifting, turning, throttle control, etc combined with not getting killed on the road, can be. Once all that starts becoming second nature then go for the desired bike and then proceed down the pathway to becoming smooth. Of course, I did the opposite (M750 first bike) and came out okay (guess the jury's still out on that ;)), though it really depends on the person (I personally feel a lot of folks should never learn to ride, for their own safety--though if they demonstrate determination, I'm all about support :)).

DJS
06-25-2004, 10:54 AM
Another cool option, if he wants the cool sportbike look, is the SV650 with Shark Skinz GSXR style race bodywork on it converted to the street. A former employee of Ducati Seattle had her race SV650 converted to street and it was sweet. It was small light and looked BADASS. I know its not a Ducati but when he is ready to purchase a Ducati Superbike he will have no problem selling that SV650. There are tons of people out there looking for an alternative sportbike option and if he does a good job customizing the SV650 it will sell fast!

http://www.pbase.com/image/28791338

image #Trackday5-6b.jpg (Racer 910)

CINDESMO
06-25-2004, 11:45 AM
I personally recommend a nice simple used bike for a couple of reasons. Some people find that motorcycling is not for them or that they don't have enough time to ride. Without any riding experience at all, you really have no clue what kind of riding you are going to end up doing or what style of bike suits your needs. Buying a touring bike that you only zip around town on probably won't create the best biking experience. With a used bike (especially a naked bike) you have one less thing to worry about...the bike!

In two and a half years I have seen virtually every model of Ducati being sold to first time bike owners, from the M620 to the superbikes, with varying degrees of success. Like everyone says, "it depends on the rider".

mike
06-25-2004, 04:57 PM
Hopefully he'll get whatever he wants and then natural selection will merrilly continue doing its work. Some people have the self-restraint to stay alive with mega power cycles as their first bike. Personally I'm glad I learned on something with less power (and off the pavement).

phildo
06-25-2004, 06:37 PM
Think you need to look at more than CC's. I started rideing earlier this summer on a HD 883. Great bike to learn on but I got bored with performance after just a few months.
Just picked up the Monster 1000s a few weeks ago and actually feel a lot safer on it...the breaks actually work, and the suspention is much better. So assuming you can exercise a bit of self control on the throttle I'd say the Monster is actually a safer bike. Funny my insurance company doesn't seem to agree. Monster insurance is 6 times as much;-(
Besides, a 600rr etc has 15-20 more HP than my 1000...all have way more go than my 883.
Guess the bottom line is ride what moves you!

motogrrl
07-02-2004, 01:08 AM
:eek: First bike a 749 :eek: SS800 :eek:
Atleast he has took the right class but he should have maybe asked his instructor about what bike to get.

I would tell him to pick up a used bike 500 cc or less to get used to the traffic and get some street smarts before getting a fine bike like above.



Yep, that's what the old B.F. told me in 98 when I asked him which BMW to buy -- "That R65 is too big for you. Just get yourself a throw-away Japanese bike for the summer."

I'm with the "buy what makes you smile" camp. :)

And I was his instructor (the student asking the question). I almost always suggest students consider buying a naked bike for their first one. Plastic is $$$$.


Kathy

motogrrl
07-02-2004, 01:11 AM
Without knowing the person it's hard to say. My very first bike ever in the history of the world was my 2003 SS800F. I'm now heading in to my second year and I have that sweet 749 jobbie. It all depends on your ability to learn, be safe, operate within (or just safely beyond) your limits and all that good stuff. I don't think there's any one right answer - the only two people that know are Kathy and her student.

Actually, there's only only one -- the student. I can't get inside their head and your points are those that count the most.

He's excited about aesthetics. :)


Kathy

POPNFRESH
07-02-2004, 02:06 PM
why not take a look at the M620 or something? i've got one now and its my first bike, insurance is super low (fullcoverage 21 bucks a month thru farmers, with no experience), its quick and has good handling, and although its no 749, it sure as hell doesnt cost 20 g's. Its good to learn on, first spin i took it out on it already felt like second nature.
and of course its still a duc.

DRS
07-03-2004, 12:16 PM
:eek: First bike a 749 :eek: SS800 :eek:
Atleast he has took the right class but he should have maybe asked his instructor about what bike to get.

I would tell him to pick up a used bike 500 cc or less to get used to the traffic and get some street smarts before getting a fine bike like above.

He could always sell a used bike for about what he pays for it a year later if he keeps it up.

Just my .02 cents

+1 what he said...